Cyberpunk Hover Car on DriveThruRPG

The Cyberpunk HoverCar kit is available on DriveThruRPG now.

This kit lets you build two mix-and-match Cyberpunk Hover cars for your 28mm sci-fi tabletop. It’s the second kit in a series of street vehicles I’m working on, and the parts also mix with the Cyberpunk Compact Car kit for even more variety.

The next kit I’m working to produce in this series will be either a sci-fi convertable with seating for 28mm or 1/56th figures, or a sci-fi urban taxicab.

Designing a Hover Car

I’ve always been a huge Blade Runner fan, so it was natural to try and take the Compact Car design and turn it into a ‘spinner’ style flying car. Unfortunately it turns out I’m not Syd Mead and after struggling with trying to get a spinner design working that didn’t look odd, or refused to gel properly in Fusion 360 I started working on a more traditional hover car.

Years of watching 80’s sci-fi movies like The Last Starfighter, Back to the Future, and Total Recall must have sunk in because a more traditional flying car just seemed to come together in Fusion 360 without difficulty. It started with a snub-nosed bumper, and a set of front hover pods that replaced the wheels and grew from there into the two vehicles I plan to release this weekend as a new kit.

Designing stuff is interesting. I think if you find yourself having to force a design, or you struggle to make progress it’s often a sign the concept is flawed, or not well thought out to begin with. My Fusion 360 account is littered with half complete or abandoned projects – which I never delete because I tend to raid them for parts and other sub-components – something Fusion 360’s CAD setup supports fairly well.

I’ve been painting test versions of the vehicles this week and just need to get a set of decent photos to show them off on DriveThruRPG.

Review: Kreative Scenery Gothic Office Building

Kim from Kreative Scenery has just released a laser cut 28mm scale Gothic Office Building. He was kind enough to give me a discounted copy to review here.

The kit comes as a series of pre-cut 3mm MDF pieces, and a set of 3D-printed parts for the window and door detailing. This first photo shows my assembled kit and the gray parts were 3D printed. They sit very nicely into the laser cut MDF framing, and Kim sensibly recommends you paint them separately before gluing them into place.

The parts are fully cut, which means the larger pieces are shipped loose in a box, and the smaller pieces included in a set of envelopes. This reduces the shipping weight for international buyers and means you can build straight out of the box using the emailed instructions. You can see the pieces I’ve scattered across my building table in this photo. The parts were assembled with PVA, with any excess being removed with a damp brush. That’s why some of the MDF looks a little pre-stained in these photos.

The build instructions are easy to follow, the pieces go together well and the resulting building is strong and light. It’s built in three sections: a ground floor, a lift-off middle floor, and roof. Each section is also built in two stages, the basic structure and then a layer of exterior detailing. This photo shows the basic structure prior to adding the roof and external detailing. There’s plenty of space inside too which means you could go to town with interior detailing if you’re playing skirmish games using the building.

Overall the finished building looks good. It definitely has the High Gothic Warhammer 40k feel but at the same time is restrained enough to fit onto pretty much any sci-fi table as an Administrative, Office or Apartment building. I could also see it sneaking onto a modern or WWII table with a few additional period buildings around it. The combination of the basic MDF structure, the external MDF detailing and the finer 3D printed window frames combine very nicely in the finished builing.

The front and back of the building are detailed differently as well which is a nice touch. It gives you two options to use depending on how you position the building on your table and also means you can place two of the same building next to each other with different facades. The front shown above has a nicely recessed doorway, with a set of smaller overhead windows, while the rear has a more industrial feel with a roller door and smaller side window.

Overall a very nice kit, that builds into a strong building that will look great on your table once painted.

Cyberpunk Compact Car on DriveThruRPG

The Cyberpunk Compact Car kit is available on DriveThruRPG now.

This kit lets you build two mix-and-match Cyberpunk Compact cars for your 28mm sci-fi tabletop. It’s also the first kit in a new series of street vehicles I’m working on. The street vehicles kits will work together with each other in the same way my earlier truck kits do, giving you more vehicle options with each kit purchased.

The next kit I’m working to produce in this series will be a flying / hover style sci-fi car that will include a stand. I’m also planning a police style cruiser and urban taxicab in the series.

Review: ERA Warfare Mgebrov-Renault Armored Car

David at ERA Warfare has released his 28mm 3D Printable Mgebrov-Renault Armored Car, and I had the pleasure of test printing and painting one for him. It’s available on DriveThru RPG now.

The Mgebrov-Renault is an early armored-car, and around 11 were built in 1915. It is an interesting design both from a historical, and a war gaming point of view. I think David’s done a great job of capturing the unique look of the historical vehicle – and the detailing including rivets and hatchwork prints surprsingly well on an FDM 3D printer.

I printed this on my Creality Ender 3 with a mixture of PLA from Wanhao and eSun. Rivet counters should be happy with the accurate design, and the vehicle also looks great on a Pulp or 30’s war gaming table. That’s why I couldn’t resist photographing it next to some of my own Pulp collection. He has plans to work up some more crazy Russian WWI/inter-war vehicles which I’m looking forward getting onto the paint station as well.

Review: Titan Terrain Vendorum

Titan Terrain are a New Zealand company producing a range of reasonably priced laser cut 3mm MDF terrain sets. This review covers the ‘Vendorum’ building kit from their Sci-Fi Slum range.

This kit comes as the five shrink wrapped MDF sheets you see above. PDF build instructions are emailed to you when the order ships. The instructions are reasonably easy to follow, but they’re not keyed and the major parts are spread of over the four sheets so there’s a little bit of figuring out to do while you build.

It is a fast build though. I put my Vendorum together on a Saturday, and the majority of that time was waiting for the PVA wood glue to dry enough to move to the next step. You’ll need a sharp Xacto to cut out the pieces from the frames, and a file or scrap of sandpaper to tidy up the edges. I also had a bag of large rubber bands handy which made gluing easier.

The parts are well cut and go together easily, exactly and the joints are sturdy. The design is clever too and many parts hide the ‘tabbed’ edges within the finished building itself which is certainly a detail I appreciated. A good example of this is the added air-conditioning units that go together from a handful of parts but still manage to hide all the edges you’ve cut within the finished unit.

The overall building is very nice once it’s complete, with the white trim details adding a final touch that brings it all together. The windows, doors and ladders are well scaled for 28-32mm sci-fi figures. As a gaming piece, the building is great too, with a number of playable surfaces: the roof-tops, the store awning, and if your rule system has climbing rules I can see figures scaling the AC units as well. The variable height of the roof-top parapets also adds visual interest, and possibly amusing arguments about cover modifiers when figures are placed against them.

A highly recommended kit. I’m now considering expanding my collection further with a few more purchases from Titan Terrain. The Factorum looks quite tempting. However as usual I should probably paint what I’ve already built first!

Garbage Truck on DriveThruRPG

Garbage Truck 28mm Scale

The fourth of our vehicle packs are available on DriveThruRPG now!

This pack lets you print and build a 28mm scale Garbage Truck for your wargame tabletop, and includes a detailed rear compactor and a separate printable ‘wheelie’ bin. It’s designed to work with sci-fi, and modern systems like Warhammer 40K Kill Team, Infinity, and the Batman Miniatures Game. The 28mm scale figure is from Pig Iron Productions, and is for reference only.

All our vehicle packs work together, allowing you to mix and match parts for even more variety on your tabletop. This pack will be followed by a Cyberpunk Street vehicle in 2019.

Garbage Truck 28mm Work in Progress

It’s been pretty quiet on this blog, mainly because I’ve been hitting the Tabletop Terrain Facebook Page with updates. For the last month I had planned to work on a Light Armored Vehicle based on the existing chassis my earlier kits use. However somehow I got distracted building a Garbage Truck back end for the Outpost Utility vehicle.

Sometimes I find parts and designs seem to flow naturally into Autodesk Fusion 360 without too much thought, and once that starts to happen I tend to just run with it, rather than fight the 3D design Muse. This Garbage Truck went together really quickly and I’m pleased with both the garbage compactor back end, and the slightly retro wheel fenders. So much so I couldn’t resist tweaking the earlier vehicles so they can use these new parts. This is something I usually try and do anyway, as a bit of a thank you to any customers that have bought the earlier kits – and (slightly less altruistically) because I want to mix and match parts myself.

I’m painting a demo Garbage Truck for the promo shots, as well as working up a simple set of instructions for this kit. I’m aiming to get the Garbage Truck out in March…and then perhaps go back to the LAV…or maybe another project I have in mind?

Prospector Rover Vehicle on DriveThruRPG

Prospector Rover Vehicle The third of our vehicle packs is up on DriveThruRPG today!

This pack lets you print and build a variety of sci-fi Prospector Rovers in 28mm scale, and includes a towable trailer that can be used with the Rover and our other vehicles.

All our vehicle packs work together, allowing you to mix and match parts for even more variety on your sci-fi tabletop. This pack will be followed by a Light Armored Vehicle in 2019.

Taking Rogue Stars for another Spin

We took Rogue Stars out for a spin again last night, and despite the rulebook suffering a lot of the usual Osprey problems we had an enjoyable game. Osprey has a hard word count on their Osprey Wargames series which often leads to very condensed rules, short on examples. Unfortunately, I think Rogue Stars suffers from this a fair amount, and people have reviewed it rather negatively online because of this. There’s a lot of reading between the lines, and common sense has to be applied in a game simply because the rulebook includes a lot of content in a fixed space.

Having said that I’ve always enjoyed Ganesha Games’ interesting activation mechanism in their skirmish games and Rogue Stars improves on this by having an activation/reaction system too. This means you’re always involved in the game regardless of which side is active. It also leads to some very interesting choices about how many times to try and activate a character vs how many reactions you’ll give away. The reacting player also has to be careful about how readily they react and what they do as there’s a cost involved for them too. It really is a clever system and works better than any other skirmish level system I’ve played.

We played Space Cops vs Bounty Hunters, with Kieran fielding a lovely set of old Grenadier/Copplestone metal soldiers with rounded helmets that looked exactly like Space Cops should. I dusted off my usual motley band of Necromunda Scavvies and called them Bounty Hunters. The Rogue Stars random scenario/complication system gave us an Abduction scenario with a whirling space vortex of doom in the centre of the table which rather complicated things for everybody! It was a ding dong fight with people getting knocked down, arms blasted off and dropping weapons all over the show – which promptly started sliding towards the vortex. We called the game after the Abduction target was blown to smithereens when a hail of heavy laser shot ruptured his flamer tank, and it was adios muchachos. A shame really because he’d been happily flaming Space Cops in the limbs and heads until then. We’re definitely keen to play some more Rogue Stars in the future, particularly since we can bust out a random selection of sci-fi figures and build them into a force.