28mm Portaloos on Thingiverse

I’ve had a few folks question me about various small 3D bits and pieces that have appeared on this blog as well as the Facebook page. Many of these were created with the intention of releasing them as scatter terrain pieces. They are now released as a pack of 28mm scatter terrain on Thingiverse, including the portaloos, tape drive, lockers and drums:¬†https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3270343

Halftrack Recovery Vehicle on DriveThruRPG

The second of our planned three vehicle packs is up on DriveThruRPG today!

This pack lets you print and build a variety of sci-fi Halftrack Recovery Vehicles in 28mm scale.

All our vehicle packs work together, allowing you to mix and match parts for even more variety on your sci-fi tabletop. This pack will be followed by the Environmental Rover early 2019.

Outpost Utility on DriveThruRPG

The first of my planned three vehicle packs are up on DriveThruRPG today!

This pack lets you print and build a variety of six-wheeled sci-fi Outpost Utility Trucks in 28mm scale.

This pack will be followed by the Halftrack Recovery Vehicle before the end of 2018. The Halftrack Recovery Vehicle will also work with the Outpost Utility pack, allowing you to mix and match parts for even more variety on your sci-fi tabletop.

Sci-Fi 28mm Outpost Utility

In the month this blog was offline, I’ve been furiously stretching my Autodesk Fusion 360 abilities by designing and printing a set of 28mm scale sci-fi vehicles. I’ve been making progress posts over on the Tabletop Terrain Facebook page, and this blog post is a roundup of those.

Back in early September, I threw together a scale test using foamboard scraps, a Bic biro, and some dressmaker’s pins. In just over a month of fevered 3D design and printing that test has turned into a series of sci-fi trucks and cranes that I’m pretty happy with. Along the way, I’ve learned a great deal about some of the more useful features of Autodesk Fusion 360, and I’ve also built up a laundry list of ideas for future projects as well.

I’m working towards releasing my first pack of STL files on DriveThruRPG for the cost of a Big Mac or so. Hopefully it’ll roll out before November ends!

Publishing Thingiverse Models

Now that I’ve designed a few bits and pieces in Fusion 360, I’ve decided to publish them all under my Thingiverse account. I’ve benefited hugely from the free war game terrain folks have published on Thingiverse, so felt like I should try and give something back to the community there.

Under that account you’ll find my original designs for:

28mm Arcade Cabinets for scatter terrain.
28mm Kitset Shipping Containers.
28mm Industrial Walkways and Ramps.
– A collection of generic War Game tokens I’ve made to use in a bunch of games like Gaslands, This is Not a Test and Rogue Stars.

Several of these projects are still ongoing and may have additional content added to them occasionally. Additionally any new designs I create for 28mm war gaming are likely to end up here too. Hopefully somebody finds them useful! Comment with a link if you do, because I’d love to see the designs in use.

This is Not a Test: Sculpting Pig Iron Productions

For many years now I’ve wanted to sculpt 28mm figures in green stuff. This year I’ve resolved to make an effort to improve my sculpting skills. However rather than attempting to sculpt a full figure from scratch, I was looking for a smaller piece of work to get started.

That’s when I realised I need a couple of Linebreakers for my This is Not a Test Peacekeeper warband. These guys are basically the melee specialists in the warband, which means they need a hand weapon and riot shield. I have a bunch of Pig Iron Kolony figures, but every torso is carrying a firearm, usually in some kind of slung pose. So I dug out my ancient strip of green stuff and got to work sculpting a replacement torso.

The top photo shows the finished product, complete with plastic-card shield and weapon. I’m reasonably happy with the final figure, although it has a few issues. First the arms are considerably thinner than the rest of my Pig Iron figures, and because of the rather fine garden wire I based them on they’re rather too flexible. It’ll be interesting to see how the painted figure stands up to transportation and gaming. For posterity here’s the steps this figure went through.

The Torso

I sculpted the basic torso over a large blob of green stuff attached to some 3mm garden wire. The blob was shaped and then filed down to a rough scale match against a production Pig Iron metal torso. This was the easiest way to get a suitable volume for the torso piece.

Next was some light sculpting work to clone a basic Pig Iron armored torso, including the interesting back plate. My efforts aren’t as crisp as the Pig Iron sculptor’s, but I’m hoping once painted you won’t notice the difference. This photo also shows the start of various packs the figures have around their waist, mainly to conceal to join at their hips and provide support to the arms.

The Fit

The basic torso was reasonably easy to sculpt, and once complete I pinned in a production head, and dry fitted a set of legs. The wire arms went through a few iterations as I tried to get the ratio right between shoulder, elbow and wrist joints compared to the figure’s height and legs.

For the arms I used wire that was far too thin, 0.9mm garden wire. On reflection I should have used the same 3mm garden wire I’d sculpted the torso on. The wire was also only pinned into the green stuff torso, which is a problem too. Really I should have made the whole armature in a single piece for additional strength. I’ve since started sculpting a second torso, for a second Linebreaker, but using 3mm wire for the arms this time around.

The Arms

By far the bulk of the time in the project was spent trying to get the arms and hands right on the figure. Here’s the finished arms sculpted holding two thin pieces of wire that formed the basis of the weapon and shield. This wire is again too thin, and isn’t connected to the wire in the arms in any meaningful way. This made sculpting arms, hands and weapons a lot more frustrating than it should have been due to movement. That said I’m reasonably happy with the hands themselves, which while a touch small do look like reasonably human grips. Both arms could have been thicker, and using thicker wire as the base for my second torso will encourage that I think. The cloth on the arms doesn’t fall in any realistic way, but this is similar to the Pig Iron figures themselves, who appear to be wearing some kind of thick, rather stiff ballistic uniform.

The final figure is on my paint table at the moment, and I’m keen to see what it’ll look like painted up and next to the full Pig Iron Product figures I’ve already completed.

This is Not a Test: Scratching Pig Iron Productions

I’m a big fan of Pig Iron Productions miniatures, which are still available thanks to the new business owners. Pig Iron figures are cast in pewter, which means they’re an excellent base for scratch building.

Here’s a couple of figures I scratched up recently for my This is Not a Test Peacekeeper warband. First is a flame thrower unit, because nothing keeps the peace like the threat of being swiftly barbecued. He’s made from a mix of Pig Iron Kolony Militia and Kolony Rebel parts. The flamethrower tanks are from a Games Workshop Cadian sprue, with the garish skull and crossbones carefully trimmed off both tanks. Fortunately the back armor of Kolony figures works well with the GW Cadian parts, and they fit nicely together with some minor filing to remove some detail from the Pig Iron figure. A bit of greenstuff piping, a paperclip and a small length of aluminium rod make up the rest of the flamethrower. The plan is to paint that last couple of mm of the paperclip as an ignition flame. I might put a small band of greenstuff around the end of the paperclip to indicate the pipe end as well.

The second scratch build, is your typical dirty sniper figure. The base is a Pig Iron figure who was holding a futuristic SMG weapon at a jaunty angle. There were only two simple bits of work required to convert him into a sniper. The gun scope is built from a bit of garden wire and two bits of carefully filed aluminium pipe. The SMG barrel was extended and silenced with a bit of paperclip and another piece of aluminium tube. Paperclips are excellent for this sort of work as the wire they’re made from is very robust, and won’t bend easily during handling.

This a Not a Test: 28mm Ruined Modern Furniture

28mm Ruined Sofas Here’s a set of the sofas I cast a couple of weeks ago, but in ruined form. These were made by taking a resin cast of the original, intact sofas, cutting chunks out of them, building them up again with green stuff and re-molding them.

This set were cast in Ultracal 30, which is a nice hard plaster that captures detail well and doesn’t effect the RTV molds I use, unlike resins which tends to dry out then tear up the molds after only a handful of casts. They’ve had feet glued on them, made from cut styrene sheet and were painted up with cheap student acrylics. The figure for scale is standing on a Games Workshop 25mm base.

I’ll probably paint up a few more sets and use them as scattered soft cover, or as a base for make-shift street barricades perhaps.

This is Not a Test: 28mm Modern Furniture

28mm Scale Modern Furniture It seems I’m on a bit of a ‘This is Not a Test’ bender, so it’s time to start putting together some simple terrain for it. TnT is a post apocalyptic game, so ruined buildings and the refuse of 20th century living seem appropriate. Mighty Ape recently had a sale on a bunch of wargaming stuff, and I picked up a box of Mantic ‘Red Brick’ scenery for a very good price. The terrain from this boxed set, combined with my existing Hirst Arts mold collection should be enough to cover a 4’x4′ TnT table.

However one thing I was struggling to find, was a good supply of 20th century 28mm scale furniture and the like. As I’m trying to improve my sculpting skills, I tried whipping up some of my own. Here’s the first set which is a simple sofa, love seat and comfy chair. They’re posed here on lumps of blu tack, with a couple of converted old Necromunda figures, on GW bases for scale. They’re on blu tack because I plan on adding feet to the casts of these masters for a bit of a height boost.

They were constructed from cheap, builder’s epoxy that sets rock hard in 5 minutes. The quick set time means these were each built up in layers. Cushions first, then a base, then the back and finally the arms were added. Then the epoxy was filed back and patched in places with grey stuff where I’d left tool marks and the like. I’ve already cast a couple of sets of them in a good hard resin and they’ve come out quite nicely. I’m currently modifying the first set and adding more detail with green stuff to try and make ruined furniture that looks slightly more post apocalyptic. I also have mad plans to try and create a 50’s ‘Fallout 3’ styled fridge, TV and oven next. I might have to dig up the molds for my old Pulp luggage as well.

This is Not a Test: Converted Raider Broiler

TnT Converted Broiler Painted My This is Not a Test Raider warband was expanded on paper after the last TCOW meet. I added a Broiler, and another Mongrel dog – so had to find suitable figures for them.

I had a few more Obelisk Miniatures Hyenas to paint so the Mongrel was covered. However I had nothing appropriate for a Broiler, who comes equipped with a free flamethrower. I did recently get a bunch of metal Bolt Action figures, one of which was a Late War German Panzergrenadier carrying a WWII flamethrower, with a set of tanks that looked like they’d be reasonably easy to press mold.

Scrabbling through my old Games Workshop figures I also found a likely looking Vampire Counts Ghoul. This guy was an out of production, lead pewter figure from the late 90’s. They were lovely sculpts and the lead pewter made them ideal for conversion as you can repose their limbs with a reasonable amount of freedom if you’re careful. Low lead pewter is a lot more brittle and prone to cracking if you try to it.

TnT Converted Broiler The other advantage of lead pewter is that it’s fairly easy to cut through. Off came the Ghoul’s original head, and away went the bone he held in his left hand. He got a new head, again from my collection of old metals – a Pig Iron Productions gas mask head.

The press moulded gas tanks from the Panzergrenadier went onto the Ghoul’s back, and had a few bits of extra sculpting added. A new ‘flamethrower’ was sculpted with gardening wire and aluminium rod. The petrol pump handle the figure ended up with was my second attempt and came out a lot better than my first attempt which involved a butchered Catachan plastic Flamer. The plastic wheel is a spare from the front of a Bolt Action Hanomag kit.

All in all, one of my better conversion efforts I think. It’ll be interesting to see how he does on the gaming table.